Challenges in the Implementation of the Single National Curriculum

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Introduction

The incumbent government has taken steps to provide a single system of education for all to eliminate inequality and class differences. It will require all provincial governments to implement a common system of education in terms of curriculum, medium of instruction, and assessment, ensuring that all children across the country have a fair and equal opportunity.

Reasons for Implementing SNC

The government has planned to end the reinforcement of class divisions through uniform education under the slogan Eik Qaum, Eik Nisaab (One Nation, One Curriculum). A lack of cohesion in the educational system has resulted in enormous gaps in learning, resulting in social inequality in Pakistani society. Pakistan’s educational system is organized into three major categories: public or government schools, private schools, and madrassas. The education imparted in these three systems has significant differences, resulting in a split between the ideological mindset of students taught in these schools. The Single National Curriculum has been put in place, primarily to bridge the gap between the three types of systems (Ministry of Federal Education and Training, 2020).

Challenges in the Implementation of the Single National Curriculum

Despite the fact that the SNC’s considerations are well thought out to develop students as effective national and global citizens with the necessary knowledge, skills, and values, the current government may face numerous challenges in implementing the single national curriculum in a shared and equally beneficial roadmap in the current diversified educational situation. Critics point to plenty of issues that the Single National Curriculum faces. Many people have objected to the adoption of this system, claiming that it was not well thought out and implemented too quickly (Robert, 2020).

The government’s first challenge is to entice more than 20 million out-of-school children to return to school. It is a difficult task for the government to provide equal opportunities for all children in an environment where textbooks differ, publishers differ, teaching and learning methods and assessment approaches differ, student success criteria, learning resources differ, and most importantly, teachers’ capacity varies greatly across education systems. Furthermore, there are one-room or two-room primary schools with just one or two teachers who have insufficient qualifications. On the other hand, there are schools with abundant human and financial resources that provide a nurturing and favourable learning environment for students (Sheikh, 2020).

Also, teachers are responsible for fulfilling all the ambitious goals linked with Single National Curriculum after the standard curriculum is implemented. Unfortunately, Pakistan has a shortage of qualified instructors, particularly at the basic and secondary levels. All the aims and objectives would be unachievable if the teachers failed to fulfil their responsibilities. Hence, there is a dire need for qualified and trained teachers. To promote consistency in varied education systems to a particular degree, the government would have to do a large amount of financial contribution for less-resourced schools. Furthermore, the government must change its investment trends in education, and education must become the state’s top priority.

The Way Forward

To make the ‘Single National Curriculum’ effective, the government must address structural issues such as teacher training, getting all out-of-school children to school, and so on. Special emphasis must be made on female education in this regard. The cultural barriers that prevent girls from receiving an education must be addressed. Furthermore, the educational sector should be given more funding. To keep SNC afloat, corrupt practices and white-collar offences must be eliminated. For madrassah reforms, the country’s religious parties and religious academics must be brought together on the same page.

Conclusion

The government’s introduction of the “Single National Curriculum” is a positive move. It would prove to be a solution for many socio-economic problems in a society like Pakistan. It’s encouraging to see that the government is finally paying attention to the long-overlooked education sector. Pakistan would soon begin making advances toward betterment, development, and advancement as a result of the restructured education system.

Bibliography

Ministry of Federal Education and Training. (2020). Single National Curriculum (SNC). Government of Pakistan. Retrieved from http://www.mofept.gov.pk/ProjectDetail/MzkyNDc2MjMtY2VjYy00ZDA4LTk5OTUtNzUyNDI3ZWMzN2Rm

Robert, D. (2020). Pros and Cons of Standards and National Curriculums. Retrieved from http://www.homeofbob.com/pedagogy/plan/curDev/proConsStandsNatCur.htm

Sheikh, N. A. (2020). Single National Curriculum: where do we stand? Pakistan and Gulf Economist. Retrieved from https://www.pakistangulfeconomist.com/2020/11/30/single-national-curriculum-snc-where-do-we-stand/

Research Questions

What is the rationale behind Single National Curriculum implementation?

What are the challenges in implementing the Single National Curriculum?

Key Takeaways

Pakistan’s educational system is organized into three categories: public or government schools, private schools, and madrassas. The Single National Curriculum is put in place primarily to bridge the gap between the three types of systems (Ministry of Federal Education and Training, 2020).

Critics point to plenty of issues that the Single National Curriculum faces. Many people have objected to the adoption of this system, claiming that it was not well thought out and implemented too quickly (Robert, 2020).

It is a difficult task for the government to provide equal opportunities for all children in an environment where textbooks differ, publishers differ, teaching and learning methods and assessment approaches differ, student success criteria, learning resources differ, and, most importantly, teachers’ capacity varies greatly across education systems.

Pakistan has a shortage of qualified instructors, particularly at the basic and secondary levels. All the aims and objectives would be unachievable if the teachers failed to fulfil their responsibilities.

To make the ‘Single National Curriculum’ effective, the government must address structural issues such as teacher training, getting all out-of-school children to school, and so on.

The government’s introduction of the “Single National Curriculum” is a positive move. It would prove to be a solution for many socio-economic problems in a society like Pakistan.

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